'All in it together'? Social cohesion in a dividing society: attitudes to income inequality and redistribution in a residential context

Authors
Kearns, Ade; Bailey, Nick; Gannon, Maria; Livingston, Mark; Leyland, Alistair
Year
2014
Journal
Journal of Social Policy, tbc, tbc
DOI
tbc
URL
http://eprints.gla.ac.uk/87308/1/87308.pdf
Abstract

This paper asks whether where someone lives bears any association with their attitudes to inequality and income redistribution, focusing on the relative contribution of neighbourhood income, density and ethnic composition. People on higher incomes showed higher support for redistribution when living in more deprived neighbourhoods. People with lower levels of altruism had higher levels of support for redistribution in neighbourhoods of higher density. People living in more ethnically mixed neighbourhoods had higher levels of support for redistribution on average, but this support declined for Whites with low levels of altruism as the deprivation of the neighbourhood increased. Current trends which sustain or extend income and wealth inequalities, reflected in patterns of residence, may undermine social cohesion in the medium- to long-term. This may be offset to some extent by trends of rising residential ethnic diversity.

Number of levels
3
Software used
Model data structure
Response types
Multivariate response model?
No
Longitudinal data?
No
Substantive discipline
Substantive keywords
Paper submitted by
Nick Bailey, Urban studies, University of Glasgow, nick.bailey@glasgow.ac.uk
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