Ruminative self-focus, negative life events, and negative affect

Authors
Moberly, N. J., & Watkins, E. R.
Year
2008
Journal
Behaviour Research and Therapy, 46, 1034-1039
DOI
10.1016/j.brat.2008.06.004
Abstract

Ruminative thinking is believed to exacerbate the psychological distress that follows stressful life events. An experience-sampling study was conducted in which participants recorded negative life events, ruminative self-focus, and negative affect eight times daily over one week. Occasions when participants reported a negative event were marked by higher levels of negative affect. Additionally, negative events were prospectively associated with higher levels of negative affect at the next sampling occasion, and this relationship was partially mediated by momentary ruminative self-focus. Depressive symptoms were associated with more frequent negative events, but not with increased reactivity to negative events. Trait rumination was associated with reports of more severe negative events and increased reactivity to negative events. These results suggest that the extent to which a person engages in ruminative self-focus after everyday stressors is an important determinant of the degree of distress experienced after such events. Further, dispositional measures of rumination predict mood reactivity to everyday stressors in a non-clinical sample.

Number of levels
3
Model data structure
Response types
Multivariate response model?
No
Longitudinal data?
No
Substantive discipline
Substantive keywords
Impact

n/a

Paper submitted by
Nicholas Moberly, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, n.j.moberly@ex.ac.uk
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